The Passover Lamb of God

(John 1:29; 12:1-7)

Six days before the Passover Feast, YAHSHUA made a trip to Bethany to the home of Lazarus; six days before His death a supper was prepared for Him; Lazarus was at the table with Him, Martha served and Mary anointed Him for His burial, setting Him apart for His death as He represented the Passover sacrificial Lamb and in essence He was the true Lamb of God that takes the sins of the world (John 1:29). He was set apart four days before His death as it was commanded that the lamb for the sacrifice would be set apart on the tenth of the month, and be killed on the fourteenth, (four days after being set apart) Exodus 12:3,6.  YAHSHUA lived those last days focused on what was to happen in His Father’s plan to redeem mankind. Behold, the Lamb of God! John Baptist’s cry to call the nation of Israel to repentance and acceptance of the Lamb of God- YAHSHUA, Who had come to be the Passover Lamb. While many were busy getting ready for that very important Passover event, YAHSHUA was quietly fulfilling His role of Lamb of God, when Mary anointed Him, not knowing the meaning of her action. But He knew and defended her at the criticism of Judas, who later betrayed Him.  

Forty Stripes – No More

Forty stripes may be given him but not more, lest, if he should be beaten with many stripes, your brother should seem low and worthless to you (Deut. 25:3).

At Pilate’s decision to let YAHSHUA go, the Jewish vehemently cried, Crucify Him! Not wanting to do that, Pilate said he would scourge Him and let Him go. YAHSHUA would then be under the mercilessness of the Roman hand of judgment. The Roman government laws were independent of the Jewish laws.  In this case, we read, forty stripes may be given him (the guilty man) but not more… Let’s compare the two and once and for all delete from your mind that YAHSHUA was beaten forty stripes. That is an erroneous teaching. 

Blurring the Meaning of Passover

On the fourteenth day of the first month at twilight is the Lord’s Passover.  (Lev. 23:5)  Passover is the most important celebrated or remembered holiday for the Christian Church. It has its beginning when Israel was freed from Egypt’s bondage. The deep meaning behind it lived for thousands of years without the Jewish people realizing its embedded prophetic message. It was to the nation of Israel a time to abstain from leaven bread, a time to sacrifice animals destined for sacrifice to atone for the nation’s sin. They were to keep the lamb or kid until the fourteenth day of the month and kill them on the evening of that day.  (Exodus 12:6)   The (animal’s) blood (the Lord said) shall be for a token or sign to you upon [the doorposts of] the houses where you are, [that] when I see the blood, I will pass over you, and no plague shall be upon you to destroy you when I smite the land of Egypt (Exodus 12: 13). And this day shall be to you for a memorial. You shall keep it as a feast to the Lord throughout your generations, keep it as an ordinance forever (Exodus 12:14). Passover was to Israel a memorial, a celebration to the Lord.