Despised, Rejected and Forsaken

“The word despise implies a strong emotional response toward that which one overlooks down with contempt, scorn, disdain. Scorn is to feel indignation toward or deep contempt for; disdain implies a haughty or arrogant attitude for what one considers beneath his dignity; condemn implies a vehement disapproval of a person or thing as vile, despicable” (Webster’s dictionary).

The word despise is a word within a word translating sentiment of hate toward others. When Israel looked at her Messiah disfigured by the wounds he suffered, and covered with His blood, they despised Him. Their emotion toward Him was one of contempt, scorn and disdain. That’s what the word despise ultimately translates to. In their scorn, they expressed indignation and disapproval, considering Him as a despicable person; in their disdain toward YAHSHUA, they showed their arrogance for Him as they considered Him beneath their dignity. Despising Him, they rejected Him. They considered Him worthless, and useless, and ultimately, sentenced Him the cruel death with a curse – death on the cross. That happened when they gave Him up to the Romans to execute the death penalty on Him- death by crucifixion according to their demand. Men’s reaction to His sufferings was one of accusation against Him. We read in Luke 23: 18-23, But they all together raised a deep cry saying, away with this man … upon Pilate concluding that He had not found offense in Him worth of death, they insistently demanded He should be crucified with loud cries… and their voices prevailed.

Pilate’s Power, Not of His Own

(John 19: 11)

In the midst of YAHSHUA’S trials there was a dialogue between Him and Pilate, since the Jews did not enter the Praetorium not to defile themselves in preparation for the Passover.  Pilate, the governor of Judea, a heathen and worshipper of the Roman gods, was now at a crossroad while presiding at the trial of YAHSHUA.  Filled with pompous pride, he warned YAHSHUA of his power to free Him or crucify Him, when YAHSHUA would not respond to his question. But Pilate was a weak man; he would not stand for what he knew was right and true, afraid of the Jewish mob. We come to this conclusion after reading the accounts of YAHSHUA’S trials, although, not knowing the complete story found in other books, as in The Archeological Writings of the Sanhedrim and Talmud of the Jews. In this book we learn that Pilate met with YAHSHUA before His trial and crucifixion.  This book includes Pilate’s report to Caesar of the arrest, trial and crucifixion and resurrection of YAHSHUA. In his report, Pilate mentions the month of YAHSHUA’S crucifixion-March; the name of his Centurion, Manlius, who after witnessing what had happened, uttered the words, “Truly this was the Son of God!” Pilate also describes the earthquake in detail at the time of YAHSHUA’S death.  His emotions, he described as “sad and pensive.”

Jews and Romans at a Crossroad

(Matthews 27:1-2,11,17-27)

The word crossroad, according to Webster dictionary, is at the point where one must choose between different courses of action.

Sometimes crossroads are unexpected emergencies as consequences of decisions of our own. Sometimes, they come to us for changes in lifestyles, sometimes a warning not to proceed. In today’s study of the event in the lives of Jewish and Roman nations, we will learn that, although a seemly bad decision was made, it was in God’s plan and purpose for the salvation of the nations. The Prophet Isaiah prophesized this many years previously: All we like sheep have gone astray, we have turned everyone to his own way; and the Lord has made to light upon Him the guilt and iniquity of us all (Isaiah 53: 6).  Rejected by His own people, YAHSHUA’S salvation was extended to all nations. John said, He came for His own, and they did not receive Him and did not welcome Him. But to as many as did receive and welcome Him He gave the authority to become the children of God, that is, to those who believe in His name (John 1:11-12).

It Was About The Sixth Hour

(John 4)

Amidst the rumor that YAHSHUA was baptizing more disciples than John was, He decided to go back to Galilee from Judea. The Bible says that it was necessary for Him to go through Samaria, a distance approximately of forty- two miles from Jerusalem. There was an important task for our Lord to do in going to Galilee through Samaria embedded in the word “necessary.”  The fact that Jews and Samaritans did not get along did not reflect the Lord’s way of thinking. He was a Jew, yes, but independent from all that was against His nature. To start with, He came from backgrounds that included Jews and Gentiles. The difference existent between Jews and Samaritans did not represent the purpose for which YAHSHUA had come to accomplish. The time had come when He had to visit the neighbor province of Samaria. The Samaritans were Jews who intermingled with foreigners and had embraced their cultures and their gods. So they were considered half-breeds and dogs.

YAHSHUA’S Travail- The Birth of His Church

He shall see [the fruit] of the travail (labor pain) of His soul and be satisfied; by His knowledge of Himself Shall My Righteous One, My Servant, justify many and make many righteous, for He shall bear their iniquities and their guilt (Isaiah 53:11).

“He shall see the fruit of the travail of His soul and be satisfied.” The born-again believer is the fruit of the travail of His soul. Even though, “the story and the message of the cross is sheer absurdity and folly to those who are perishing and in their way to perdition, to us who are being saved it is the power of God” (ICor.1 18). YAHSHUA’S labor pains were marked when the Father let all our iniquities fall on Him. In the flogging, the world was offered physical healing. In His death, many were reconciled with the Father and were born anew. It confirmed His words to Nicodemus, Unless a man is born of water and [even] the Spirit, he cannot enter the kingdom of God. You must be born-again (John 3:5,7b). It is only through YAHSHUA’S travail that man receives life eternal. Paul said that no mortal man should boast of his own merit to acquire salvation (I Cor. 1: 29). YAHSHUA, the only Way, Truth and the only life Giver, paid for our salvation in full through His travails before and when on the cross.

Miracles at YAHSHUA’S Crucifixion

In the midst of chaos, YAHSHUA performed yet great miracles as He was letting go of His life to prove men that He was Whom He said He was. Embed by pains from His head to His toes, from His inner soul to His spirit, He, even though God, suffered as man in every sense of the word, for He was condemned as man by His Father, when He took upon Himself the sins of the world. However, He never stopped being God. Nature knew and reacted in the form of trembling. It was as if it could understand and perceive what was happening to the One Who had created it. The miracles that surrounded the atmosphere were vividly proclaiming to men that that Man was not an ordinary man, He was God! Nature could not be quiet about it.