Miracles at YAHSHUA’S Crucifixion

In the midst of chaos, YAHSHUA performed yet great miracles as He was letting go of His life to prove men that He was Whom He said He was. Embed by pains from His head to His toes, from His inner soul to His spirit, He, even though God, suffered as man in every sense of the word, for He was condemned as man by His Father, when He took upon Himself the sins of the world. However, He never stopped being God. Nature knew and reacted in the form of trembling. It was as if it could understand and perceive what was happening to the One Who had created it. The miracles that surrounded the atmosphere were vividly proclaiming to men that that Man was not an ordinary man, He was God! Nature could not be quiet about it.

First, the sun, the chief light of the day, decided it would not shine its Creator’s agony to sinful men. For the three hours YAHSHUA suffered His worst pain; it was as if God was hiding from the eyes of men the sufferings of His Son by turning the sun’s lights off. He had already suffered enough physical pain from the hands of sinful men. But His last agonies were hidden from the world, so that it would be a moment when they would stop mocking and making a spectacle of Him through the cruelty of their sinful nature. Three hours of darkness must have made men ponder about the meaning of it. Except for the Roman Centurion and his guards, nothing we read about men’s reactions that showed significant meaning toward knowledge of YAHSHUA’S divinity and their repentance.

The number three shone during the trials and crucifixion of our Lord. That meant that the “Three in One” all suffered the ordeal YAHSHUA suffered. He was crucified at nine o’clock in the morning; nine is 3X3. From twelve until three o’clock in the afternoon darkness ruled the land. Twelve is 3X4. On the third hour of darkness, YAHSHUA cried with a loud voice, expressing the worst pain He ever suffered in that ordeal- the separation from His Father, when He suffered hell for us. It affected the religious site of the Jewish nation when the curtain of the temple was torn in two opening the door for all to enter the presence of God, that is, those who would accept Him. Interesting thing is that YAHSHUA being God, even there on the cross was the one Who tore the curtain, as He took the position of our High Priest. The curtain of the temple was six feet long and thirty feet wide, with the thickness of the palm of a man’s hand. It was made from 72 squares woven from thick material. No man could ever tear it with bear hands. It was without a doubt the work of God. The most fascinating fact was that it happened at the time when YAHSHUA died and also when the priests were in the place of the Holy of Holies performing their priestly duty, facing the curtain. It was torn in two equal parts. It just happened right in front of their eyes. As a result, the Bible reports that great many priests accepted their Messiah. Acts 6:7 says: And the message of God kept on spreading, and the number of disciples multiplied greatly in Jerusalem; and a large number of the priests were obedient to the faith [in YAHSHUA as the Messiah, through whom is obtained eternal salvation in the kingdom of God].  YAHSHUA not only reconciled men to Himself, but also opened the door for them to enter into His presence at any time. That is a great honor given to men. Undeserved as we are, punishment should have been ours, not blessings. With His death, even when we were his enemies, He reconciled us to God (Himself) (Rom. 5:10a). When He tore the temple’s curtain, He gave us full freedom and confidence to enter into the [Holy of] Holies by the blood of YAHSHUA (Heb. 10:19). It happened by the power of His blood, not the blood of animals, which were being sacrificed at the same time.

Earth revolted when it witnessed the death of its Creator, sending shock waves radiating to its surface from underground as in an earthquake, splitting the rocks, creating panic in many people who did not understand the cause, especially those who had rejected Him and given Him up to be crucified. It even brought to life saints, who had died some time ago. The power of YAHSHUA’S life, even when physically dead, shocked the earth and it stirred up the dead saints to life. Where His presence is there will be life, no matter what. That was a powerful miracle. No one should ever have doubted the reason for it; no one should ever have doubted the meaning of it. We see here YAHSHUA’S power of resurrection, which will happen in the future at the time of the rapture of His church, when only those “in Christ” will come to life. Note that not all dead came to life in His death, only the saints; and not all will be brought to life in the first resurrection, only His bride. YAHSHUA, when facing the death of Lazarus, introduced Himself to Martha as the Resurrection and Life. He was and is the solution for every problem man has. He said, I am the Resurrection and the Life. Whoever believes in Me, although he may die, yet he shall live (John 11:25).

Another significant miracle that happened at the death of YAHSHUA was the conversion of the Roman Centurion and his guards. Interesting to note is that those Romans had no knowledge of Whom YAHSHUA was; YAHSHUA, when they were crucifying Him, said a prayer of forgiveness we must not forget to whom it was directed. It was directed to those soldiers who hammered the nails in His hands and feet, who speared His side, who carved His brains with a crown of thorns, who whipped Him to the point of breaking His body through the skin, muscles reaching the bone, causing His body to be out of joint. It was to these cruel and godless Romans to whom YAHSHUA’S prayer of forgiveness was offered. Ingrained in their culture and religion, they were lost without YAHSHUA’S prayer on their behalf. But because God so loved the world to the point of giving His only begotten Son, these Romans were part of the plan of salvation, even if they were the ones killing God’s Son. They well represented the “world” and that prayer was necessary to bring them in too. Matthew reports that when the Centurion and those who were with him keeping watch over YAHSHUA observed the earthquake and all that was happening, they were terribly frightened and filled with awe and said, truly this was God’s Son! What a proclamation coming from a pagan, godless mouth! No longer had that, now these men witnessing the miracles at the foot of the cross, believed YAHSHUA to be the Son of God. Salvation is a result of a confession that YAHSHUA is Lord; Paul said, For with the heart a person believes and so is justified, and with the mouth he confesses and confirms [his] salvation (Rom. 10:9a-10). When our Savior YAHSHUA went to the cross, He went with the purpose to save men from eternal death. He took our cross and with His shedding blood He washed all who wanted, clean, including the thief on the cross, who had acknowledged Him as Lord and to be an innocent man. After he defended YAHSHUA against the other thief, He then asked Him, Lord, remember me when You come in your kingly glory! And YAHSHUA answered him: Truly, I tell you today you shall be with Me in Paradise (Luke 23:40-43). This was a promise for a thief at the end of his life for having believed YAHSHUA, and for all of us who will receive Him.

Behold, the Messiah (part 1)

Who has believed our message? asked Isaiah. The Messiah came to His people but they received Him not. He grew up before His Heavenly Father like a tender plant out of dry ground- loved and accepted only by few. His own betrayed Him for a sum of thirty shekels. Judas, the betrayer and one of His disciples, taking charge of a band of soldiers and some guards of the high priests and Pharisees, delivered Messiah with a kiss to the Jewish authorities. Judas was not an enemy who taunted Him; nor was not one who hated Him; but it was a man of His equal, His companion and one of His familiar friends; one who ate with Him. His own people delivered Him to the Roman government with insistence and urgency, with loud cries demanding Governor Pilate to crucify Him.

After His last supper on earth, having spent His last hours privately with His disciples sharing His last words and preparing them for what was to come, the Messiah went to a special garden, which was His custom to do. Gethsemane was His place of prayer. A quiet and isolated place away from all the noises of the crowd. That night, however, was His last visit to that garden. He had come to that garden this time to confront the reality of the plenitude of the time of His trials and ultimately death by crucifixion. There He prayed in agony more earnestly and intently, for the stress of the moment caused His sweat to become like great clots of blood dropping down upon the ground. He prayed: Father, if You are willing, remove this cup from Me; yet not My will, but Yours be done. An angel appeared to Him from heaven to strengthen Him at that time. Moments later a crowd lead by His betrayer showed up. They came out with swords and clubs as if He were a robber. They were the chief priests and captains of the temple and the elders. They took Him first to Annas, the father-in-law of Caiaphas, who was the high priest. Then He was bound and taken to the house of the high priest. So, it started the series of His unjust and illegal trials.

A Manger, a Donkey, a Guestroom, a Cross and a Tomb

Because the blood of bulls and goats is powerless to take sins away, hence when He [Christ} entered into the world, He said, Sacrifices and offerings You have not desired, but instead You have made ready a body for Me…Then I said, Behold, here I am, coming to do Your will, O God what is written of Me in the volume of the Book (Heb. 10: 4-5,7).  This is the most celebrated birth. The Son of God did not come according to the will of man, but of God. The place where God chose for His Son to be born was most significant and meaningful, although many are ignorant of this fact. The Son of God came to fulfill His Father’s will of salvation for humankind. He came representing a lamb for the purpose of being offered as a sacrifice to take the sins of the world. As such, He was given a manger for a crib in His birth. Not a regular manger, but a special one, where only the perfect chosen lambs laid their heads. These were raised for the temple sacrifice as an atonement for the sins of the nation of Israel. No one knew why there was no room for God’s Son to have a proper place to be born and a crib to lay His head. However, God does not need the things of the world to accomplish His intents and purposes. He has chosen the people from whom He was to bring His Son to the world and the exact place where He wanted to manifest His glory. His glory shone brighter in that humble place, where shepherds and lambs witnessed His glory and rejoiced, while the world slept through it, knowing nothing that was happening.

His Broken Body

Not a sound, not a cry

They came to take Him away

In violent disarray

In the night while in the Garden

Gethsemane, that was

In intense prayer

While sweat like blood clots

Ran down His face


Swords, clubs, torches

To lighten into the dark

Of the mob’s coward way

They came, Jesus, we want

I am He, He replied

At His voice, they fell

backward to the ground

Their strength gone.


With a kiss He was marked

For trials by the authorities

Of crimes not committed

The verdict by Rome

Not guilty of the charges

Crucify Him, others cried

Rome’s deaf to the truth

Listened to the mob’s voice


Cesar, Cesar, our king

Away with Jesus

Crucify Him, crucify Him!

Pilate scourged and whipped Him

Mercilessly by the hands

Of his soldiers, one by one

In a spectacle of cruelty

Disgraced and guilty


Despised, Rejected and Forsaken

“The word despise implies a strong emotional response toward that which one overlooks down with contempt, scorn, disdain. Scorn is to feel indignation toward or deep contempt for; disdain implies a haughty or arrogant attitude for what one considers beneath his dignity; condemn implies a vehement disapproval of a person or thing as vile, despicable” (Webster’s dictionary).

The word despise is a word within a word translating sentiment of hate toward others. When Israel looked at her Messiah disfigured by the wounds he suffered, and covered with His blood, they despised Him. Their emotion toward Him was one of contempt, scorn and disdain. That’s what the word despise ultimately translates to. In their scorn, they expressed indignation and disapproval, considering Him as a despicable person; in their disdain toward YAHSHUA, they showed their arrogance for Him as they considered Him beneath their dignity. Despising Him, they rejected Him. They considered Him worthless, and useless, and ultimately, sentenced Him the cruel death with a curse – death on the cross. That happened when they gave Him up to the Romans to execute the death penalty on Him- death by crucifixion according to their demand. Men’s reaction to His sufferings was one of accusation against Him. We read in Luke 23: 18-23, But they all together raised a deep cry saying, away with this man … upon Pilate concluding that He had not found offense in Him worth of death, they insistently demanded He should be crucified with loud cries… and their voices prevailed.

Pilate’s Power, Not of His Own

(John 19: 11)

In the midst of YAHSHUA’S trials there was a dialogue between Him and Pilate, since the Jews did not enter the Praetorium not to defile themselves in preparation for the Passover.  Pilate, the governor of Judea, a heathen and worshipper of the Roman gods, was now at a crossroad while presiding at the trial of YAHSHUA.  Filled with pompous pride, he warned YAHSHUA of his power to free Him or crucify Him, when YAHSHUA would not respond to his question. But Pilate was a weak man; he would not stand for what he knew was right and true, afraid of the Jewish mob. We come to this conclusion after reading the accounts of YAHSHUA’S trials, although, not knowing the complete story found in other books, as in The Archeological Writings of the Sanhedrim and Talmud of the Jews. In this book we learn that Pilate met with YAHSHUA before His trial and crucifixion.  This book includes Pilate’s report to Caesar of the arrest, trial and crucifixion and resurrection of YAHSHUA. In his report, Pilate mentions the month of YAHSHUA’S crucifixion-March; the name of his Centurion, Manlius, who after witnessing what had happened, uttered the words, “Truly this was the Son of God!” Pilate also describes the earthquake in detail at the time of YAHSHUA’S death.  His emotions, he described as “sad and pensive.”

Jews and Romans at a Crossroad

(Matthews 27:1-2,11,17-27)

The word crossroad, according to Webster dictionary, is at the point where one must choose between different courses of action.

Sometimes crossroads are unexpected emergencies as consequences of decisions of our own. Sometimes, they come to us for changes in lifestyles, sometimes a warning not to proceed. In today’s study of the event in the lives of Jewish and Roman nations, we will learn that, although a seemly bad decision was made, it was in God’s plan and purpose for the salvation of the nations. The Prophet Isaiah prophesized this many years previously: All we like sheep have gone astray, we have turned everyone to his own way; and the Lord has made to light upon Him the guilt and iniquity of us all (Isaiah 53: 6).  Rejected by His own people, YAHSHUA’S salvation was extended to all nations. John said, He came for His own, and they did not receive Him and did not welcome Him. But to as many as did receive and welcome Him He gave the authority to become the children of God, that is, to those who believe in His name (John 1:11-12).

It Was About The Sixth Hour

(John 4)

Amidst the rumor that YAHSHUA was baptizing more disciples than John was, He decided to go back to Galilee from Judea. The Bible says that it was necessary for Him to go through Samaria, a distance approximately of forty- two miles from Jerusalem. There was an important task for our Lord to do in going to Galilee through Samaria embedded in the word “necessary.”  The fact that Jews and Samaritans did not get along did not reflect the Lord’s way of thinking. He was a Jew, yes, but independent from all that was against His nature. To start with, He came from backgrounds that included Jews and Gentiles. The difference existent between Jews and Samaritans did not represent the purpose for which YAHSHUA had come to accomplish. The time had come when He had to visit the neighbor province of Samaria. The Samaritans were Jews who intermingled with foreigners and had embraced their cultures and their gods. So they were considered half-breeds and dogs.

YAHSHUA’S Travail- The Birth of His Church

He shall see [the fruit] of the travail (labor pain) of His soul and be satisfied; by His knowledge of Himself Shall My Righteous One, My Servant, justify many and make many righteous, for He shall bear their iniquities and their guilt (Isaiah 53:11).

“He shall see the fruit of the travail of His soul and be satisfied.” The born-again believer is the fruit of the travail of His soul. Even though, “the story and the message of the cross is sheer absurdity and folly to those who are perishing and in their way to perdition, to us who are being saved it is the power of God” (ICor.1 18). YAHSHUA’S labor pains were marked when the Father let all our iniquities fall on Him. In the flogging, the world was offered physical healing. In His death, many were reconciled with the Father and were born anew. It confirmed His words to Nicodemus, Unless a man is born of water and [even] the Spirit, he cannot enter the kingdom of God. You must be born-again (John 3:5,7b). It is only through YAHSHUA’S travail that man receives life eternal. Paul said that no mortal man should boast of his own merit to acquire salvation (I Cor. 1: 29). YAHSHUA, the only Way, Truth and the only life Giver, paid for our salvation in full through His travails before and when on the cross.

Miracles at YAHSHUA’S Crucifixion

In the midst of chaos, YAHSHUA performed yet great miracles as He was letting go of His life to prove men that He was Whom He said He was. Embed by pains from His head to His toes, from His inner soul to His spirit, He, even though God, suffered as man in every sense of the word, for He was condemned as man by His Father, when He took upon Himself the sins of the world. However, He never stopped being God. Nature knew and reacted in the form of trembling. It was as if it could understand and perceive what was happening to the One Who had created it. The miracles that surrounded the atmosphere were vividly proclaiming to men that that Man was not an ordinary man, He was God! Nature could not be quiet about it.