Two Trumpets of Silver

While in their journey through the desert God commanded Moses to make two trumpets of silver for the purposes of (1) assembly (2) to move on (3) to war (4) to rejoice. He said, Make two trumpets of silver; of hammered or turned work you shall make them, that you may use them to call the congregation and for breaking camp (Num. 10:1). These trumpets were to signal events; they were of only one tone with two basic calls: the tekiah made of a short blast and the teruah made of a series of fast staccato blast sounds. And if one blast on a single trumpet is blown, then the princes or leaders, heads of the tribes of Israel, shall gather themselves to you; when you blow an alarm, the camps of the east side shall set out; when you blow an alarm the second time, then the camps on the south side shall set out. An alarm shall be blown whenever they are to set out on their journeys; when the congregation is to be assembled, you shall blow [the trumpets in short, sharp tones](teruah) but not the blast of an alarm (tekiah)…When you go to war in your land against your enemy that oppresses you them blow an alarm with the trumpets that you may be remembered before the Lord your God, and you shall be saved from your enemies; also in the day of rejoicing and in your set feasts, and at the beginnings of your months, you shall blow the trumpets over your burnt offerings and your peace offerings; thus they may be a remembrance before your God, I am the Lord your God (Num. 10:4-7,9-10). God used the trumpets’ sounding to communicate with the people; the shofars as well as the silver trumpets were used for the same purpose. These silver trumpets were of a long form.

What these silver trumpets mean to us Christians? As silver must go through the process of purification by fire, beaten and hammered to get where it must look useful and beautiful, we, as sons and daughters of God by the new birth through the blood of YAHSHUA, also go through the process of purification through being molded into the image of God’s Son unto sanctification. Sanctified then we are silver trumpets proclaiming  clearly in purity the sound of truth that sets men free from the world of sin and its consequences. We are trumpeters for Christ encouraging others to move away from the world, and assemble with God’s people to render Him greatness and praise, to fight the enemy dressed up with the complete armor of God. So we are symbolizing the two silver trumpets in their meaning fulfilling God’s purpose for the world today. We are God’s voice in the wilderness blowing the trumpets, sounding an alarm or calling all to gather to God in repentance and humility for salvation. 

Many are sounding their trumpets with unclear and confusing sounds proclaiming their own truth and misleading many. Paul asked, If the trumpet give an uncertain voice who shall prepare himself for war? (I Cor. 14:8). We can expand the question to who can prepare himself to face God at the end of his life? A trumpeter whose spiritual life sounds rusty, confusing and uncertain is one in need of repentance and return to the Lord. A prodigal son has no place in the kingdom, unless he repents and returns to the Father. John advises us to test the spirits to see if are from God. He said, Beloved, do not put faith in every spirit, but prove (test) the spirits to discover whether they proceed from God; for many false prophets have gone forth into the world (I John 4:1). A trumpeter that does not acknowledge and confess that YAHSHUA the Messiah has come in the flesh is not of God (I John 4:3).

The message of the Gospel should sound clearly free from doubts and confusion. Many will say in that day, Lord, Lord, have we not prophesied in Your name and driven out demons in Your name and done many mighty works in Your name? And then I will say to them openly, I never knew you; depart from Me, you who act wickedly (Matt. 7:22-23). God has given us guidelines to know who the false trumpeters are. It is up to us to make the decision. At the end the burden will fall not only on the one who mislead you, but on you also who did not follow God’s guidelines. Among the prophets of the Old Testament, Jeremiah fought false trumpeters and suffered in their hands with great zeal to deliver the nation from their deceits. These were false prophets and false shepherds, and priests who sounded false messages to the people. He was put in jail; they threw him in a dungeon for many days. In Lamentations 3:54-57 he describes his ordeal: I have been hunted down like a bird by those who were my enemies without cause; they destroyed my life in the dungeon and cast a stone above me; the waters ran down on my head; I said, I am gone; I called upon Your name, O Lord, out of the depths  of the dungeon; You hear my voice O hide not Your ear at my prayer for relief; You drew near on the day I called to You; You said, Fear not. Jeremiah was a true trumpeter (prophet) whose zeal for truth caused him to weep for his people; a prophet that stood the test of time without running away from his calling.

As Jeremiah did, we God’s true silver trumpeters should sound the truth for all to hear, even at the cost of our life. For God we should do it, for we are here to destroy the works of the devil, by sounding the alarm warning many of Satan’s strategies to destroy their lives. God’s Son was manifested to undo the works of the devil; we are His ambassadors sounding victory through truth that will set all free from Satan’s destruction. Test the spirits, my friend. Follow not where the truth is not told; rather “stand by the roads and look; and ask for the eternal path, where the good, old way is; then walk in it” (Jeremiah 6:16a).

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s